Science and internet dating

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The theory of desired dissimilar immune system matching can be quantified according to markers on a person’s major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a large gene region that controls the immune system response, and postulates that couples attracted to this type of scent owing to the result that a resultant child would create a more robust immune system, more defensive against a greater variety of pathogens.In the mid 1970s, MHC-dissimilar tendency matching was shown to be the case for mice (and later for other animals such as fish) and in 1995 Swiss biologist Claus Wedekind, creator of the sweat T-shirt study, proved that the pattern holds for humans.Our busy modern lives make it hard to meet new people, so more and more of us are turning to technology to find that special someone.Once the last resort for lonely hearts, online dating has become socially acceptable, even widespread – 4.7 million British people visited a dating site during 2008."Selecting a mate can be one of the largest psychological and economic decisions a person can make and has long been the subject of social science research across a range of disciplines, all of which acknowledge one phenomenon: positive assortative mating behaviour (homogamy)," Mr Whyte said.

His work applying Machine Learning to the world of online dating has generated significant coverage (Forbes, MIT Technology Review, UPI, among others), so we wanted to know more! Q - How did you get interested in Data Science / Machine Learning? I was involved in research projects that leveraged data from online social networks and social media.All these made me believe that the availability of such data will bring a brand new perspective to the study of people's social behaviors and interactions.Q - What was the first data set you remember working with? A - My first research project using a real-world dataset was about collecting and analyzing data about humanitarian agencies and their networks.In dating sites, science-based online dating sites are those pair-matching websites that claim to use “science”, such as chemistry, genetics, psychology, or the scientific method, etc., to match up potential couples.[1] , motto: “lets people experience real chemistry”, a subsidiary of (Alexa-rank: 310), launched in 2006 and developed, in large part, on the theories of American anthropologist Helen Fisher, which claims to match people according to compatibility and chemistry.

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